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games craps

Even blindfolded in a crowded casino, anyone can find the craps table when the dice are hot. Jackpot winners on slot machines may be the loudest individuals in the house, but nothing is quite like the collective excitement that builds at a craps table.

Whereas blackjack players are quiet studies in concentration, craps players let loose as they win or lose together.

Conversely, nothing is quite as dead as a craps table when the dice are cold.

At peak hours, when you see three or four somber individuals at the big table for 24, you can be sure the loser 7s have been coming up all too frequently. An average speed at a busy blackjack table runs around 60 hands per hour, but the house expects about 100 decisions per hour at craps.

That, along with the tendency of craps players to have several bets working at once, means that craps requires a larger bankroll than other table games.

And craps offers the widest variety of bets in the casino, with dozens of wagering options on the table. But casino games were not designed to chase customers away, and craps is easier than it looks at first glance.

Yes, there are an enormous number of bets available, but only a few are really worth playing.

And those few are among the best bets in the casino.

In this article, we'll discuss the fundamentals of craps, as well as the wide variety of bets and which ones to place at the right times to increase your odds of winning.

We will begin with the layout of the table and the common terminology used for a game. At the center of one side of the table is the boxman, who supervises the game and takes cash collected by the dealers and deposits it in a drop box.

Directly opposite him is the stickman, who uses a stick to push the dice to the shooter. He calls out the results of each roll and keeps up a continuous patter, urging players to get their bets down.

At the center of the table between the boxman and stickman are boxes for proposition bets -- one-roll bets.